Friday May 26, 2017

Preview: Cuban Art at the Armory Show

Where to find Cuban art & artists during New York’s art week

Los Carpinteros, Polvo Rojo {diptych), 2016

© Los Carpinteros, courtesy Sean Kelly, New York

This week sees the opening of the 2017 Armory Show on Thursday—and with it, a raft of additional fairs and events. Here’s a quick guide, in alphabetical order, to some of the top spots to see Cuban art, including a couple of satellite fairs.

At the Armory Show…

Galería Casado Santapau. The Madrid-based gallery is bringing works by Alexandre Arrechea, including the painted construction Mapa del silencio (Box), 2017. Also on view: the large-scale tapestry L2VED2CH3, 2015, which debuted at Arrechea’s show at the Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes during the 2015 Havana Biennial.

Alexandre Arrechea, Mapa del Silencio, 2017

Courtesy Galería Casado Santapau, Madrid

Galleria Continua. The gallery is presenting a solo exhibition of Carlos Garaicoa, with recent work appearing alongside early pieces like the diptychs Rivoli or the Place Where the Blood Flows, 1993, and New Architectures for Cuito Cuanavale, 1999. Installations include The Roots of the World, 2016, an image of contained violence that invites us to rethink the dynamic of construction and destruction. 

Detail of Carlos Garaicoa, The Roots of the World, 2016

Courtesy Galleria Continua

Galería Habana. Havana’s top gallery returns with a new—and at press time, yet undisclosed—roster of artists for the 2017 show. Last year, Ariamna Contino, Carlos Garaicoa, and Iván Capote were featured; this year’s selection promises to be equally interesting.

Diana Fonseca Quiñones, Untitled, 2016, from the Degradaciones series

© Diana Fonseca Quiñones, courtesy Sean Kelly, New York

Sean Kelly Gallery. Los Carpinteros are frequently showcased in SKG’s art-fair appearances, and they’ll be on view here as well. For this Armory outing, they’ll be joined by Diana Fonseca Quiñones, whose abstract Degradaciones series is constructed of paint flakes scavenged from Havana’s aging buildings.

Jack Shainman Gallery.  His show at the gallery's 24th Street space remains on view through next Sunday, March 11, but work by Yoan Capote is also included in the Jack Shainman Armory booth. The show in Chelsea spotlights Capote's recent fish hook paintings, so look for other works at the piers—like Mass Portrait, a stone sculpture from 2009.

Yoan Capote, Mass Portrait, 2009

© Yoan Capote, courtesy the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York

Fredric Snitzer Gallery. Last fall, the Miami gallery presented Rafael Domenech’s solo show, The List of Messier Objects. At the Armory Show, look for recent work by Domenech that continues to explore the themes of that exhibition, including scale and space, systems, and geographical identity.

Rafael Domenech, Untitled (Turangalîla), 2017

Courtesy Fredric Snitzer Gallery, Miami

Rafael Domenech, Untitled (Black with orange parts), 2017

Courtesy Fredric Snitzer Gallery, Miami

Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery. At Wolkowitz, look for recent work by José Parlá, including the wall-like Writer Mentors/Passage Rights, 2016, an acrylic-and-plaster work measuring 5 x 8 feet.

José Parlá, Writer Mentors / Passage Rights, 2016

Courtesy Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery, New York

Pan American Art Projects is participating in the Armory Show for the first time, with the selection of Abel Barroso’s 2012 Pinball del emigrante, which focuses on a series of playable wooden pinball machines that explore questions of migration and cultural identity. The work is included in a new Armory Show section, Platform. Curated by Eric Shiner, former director of the Andy Warhol Museum, Platform features a selection of large-scale pieces, installations, and site-specific works by an international roster of artists.

Abel Barroso, Pinball del Emigrante, 2012

Courtesy Pan American Art Projects, Miami

And elsewhere…

Galerie Lelong at ADAA. For ADAA: The Art Show (running March 1–5), Galerie Lelong is presenting a solo booth spotlighting Cuban-born artist Zilia Sánchez. The booth traces the evolution of Sánchez’s ongoing Topología series from the 1960s to the present.

Zilia Sánchez, Topología erótica (from the series las Amazonas), 1968

© Zilia Sánchez, courtesy Galerie Lelong, New York

NG Art Gallery at Scope. At Scope, Panama City–based NG Art Gallery will feature work by five Cuban artists: Adrián Fernández, Jorge Otero, Niels Reyes, José Luis Bermúdez, and Jorge Dáger. The fair runs March 2–5.