Saturday September 23, 2017

Janet Batet

On the Horizon: Cuban Artists on Both Sides of the Strait

At the Pérez Art Museum Miami, Interior Landscapes opens the three-part exhibition On the Horizon: Contemporary Cuban Art from the Jorge M. Pérez Collection. Janet Batet surveys the high points and thinks about what she’d like to see in the next installments.

Playing the Fool: On the Tradition of Comic Politics in Cuba

In Miami, Hacerse el Bobo / Playing the Fool takes as its starting point the figure of El Bobo de Abela, the beloved 1926 creation of artist and caricaturist Eduardo Abela. Janet Batet takes a closer look at the Bobo and his satirical descendants in the work of 3 contemporary Cuban artists.

Laughing Matters: A Short History of Political Satire in Cuba

While Janet Batet’s article on the exhibition Playing the Fool considers Abela’s El Bobo and his contemporary descendants in Cuban art, satire did not start with El Bobo’s appearance in 1926. As a companion to her article on Playing the Fool, here is Batet’s brief history of political satire on the island.

A Fertile Universe: Tomás Esson’s Miami Flow

Janet Batet surveys the art and career of Tomás Esson, and the tormented, mythological beings, erogenous plant life, and other motifs that populate his art, including the show that just closed in Miami.

In Focus: Alexandre Arrechea’s Tied Stone

As the year draws to a close, we’re turning our attention to recent exhibitions that are worth a closer look—including Alexandre Arrechea’s recent solo show at Fredric Snitzer Gallery.

On the Sunset of Anatolia: The Persistent Images of Julio Larraz

Julio Larraz (Havana, 1944) is known for a distinctive, almost metaphysical approach to painting and composition. Responding to his recent exhibition at Miami’s Ascaso Gallery, Janet Batet ponders the enigmatic, inviting character of Larraz’s vision.

Artists, Institutions, and “The Lost Generation”: Dialogues in Cuban Art, Part 2

In Part 1 of our report on “Dialogues in Cuban Art: An Artist Exchange Program between Havana and Miami,” Janet Batet focused on the panel outlining the history of Cuban art in Miami. Here, she turns to the heart of the symposium: the panels featuring artists and curators from both sides of the Florida Strait.

On "Dialogues in Cuban Art: An Exchange Program Between Havana and Miami"

Janet Batet reports on the two-day symposium that took place in Miami at the end of April. Here in Part 1, she discusses the panel on Cuban art in Miami, with the report on the artists’ and curators’ panels to come in Part 2.

Growing Up in Neverland: A Look at Cuban Art and Society

The group show, organized by Pinar del Río–based curator David Horta, brought Cuban art and artists to the University of Tampa. Janet Batet looks at the exhibition and some of its highlights.

Miami Art Week: Top Spots for Cuban Art

Today, the most important art fair in the Western Hemisphere opens its doors—and with it, a flock of satellite fairs, gallery shows, and museum exhibitions take over Miami. Janet Batet offers an inside look on where to find Cuban art and artists this weekend.

In Conversation: Rafael Domenech

Temporality, sensory perception, and spatial relations are concepts at the core of Rafael Domenech’s artmaking process. In a conversation with Janet Batet, Domenech talks about how these concepts have informed his latest work, recently on view in an austerely beautiful exhibition in Miami.

Permutations: Contemporary Art from Havana

Miami welcomes a group show of leading artists based in Havana. Janet Batet offers an overview of the exhibition.

Hidden Havana City: Turning a Fresh Eye on the Familiar

Through the eye of Havana photographer Yunior Yanes, the structure of the city is converted into rhythms, lights and geometries that reveal the underlying charm trapped within in the everyday. Janet Batet looks at the artist's current show in Miami.

Exhibition Close-Up: Candelario’s Equipajes Personales at Dimensions Variable

In Havana, the artist Candelario Lassa is known for ambitious, community-based art projects in the city’s San Agustín district. This spring, members of the Miami community got to experience Candelario’s socially committed art. Janet Batet gives us a closer look at Equipajes Personales.

Exhibition Close-Up: Pavel Acosta: Stolen from the Met

Most artists create paintings from paint, but in Pavel Acosta’s case, it isn’t squeezed from a tube. It’s scraped—or “stolen”—off a gallery wall. Janet Batet takes a closer look at the conceptual underpinnings behind Acosta’s new series and exhibition, Stolen from the Met.

Pedro Pablo Oliva: “I don’t deliberately go in search of cubanía”

The painter Pedro Pablo Oliva recently presented his colorful expressionist works in Miami’s Latin Art Core Gallery, his first U.S. show in ten years. Janet Batet spoke with Oliva about his career and philosophy.

Close-Up: Luis Cruz Azaceta

This fall saw the opening of not one but two solo shows by Luis Cruz Azaceta, both currently on view. Janet Batet reflects on Azaceta’s recent work and recurring themes.

Janet Batet on Antonia Eiríz: “In the Eye of the Sibyl”

Earlier this month, the exhibition Antonia Eiríz: A Painter and Her Audience opened at the MDC Museum of Art + Design in Miami. Writer and curator Janet Batet shares excerpts from her essay “Antonia Eiríz: En la pupila de la sibila,” which appears in the exhibition catalogue. 
 

Miami Preview: A Feast of Cuban Art During ABMB

The countdown has already begun for Art Basel Miami Beach 2012, and many satellite fairs open today. Here’s a preview of Cuban art, artists, galleries, and exhibitions to catch while you’re in town.

Juan Carlos Alom: A Retrospective at Buzzart, Miami

Janet Batet delves into Alom’s seductive visual universe, in a journey through contemporary daily life on the island.

Habitar, Construir, Pensar: Cuban Video in Miami

In a recent show of Cuban video art in Miami, curator Dennys Matos assembled an ambitious lineup of 21 artists, inviting “contemplation of what it means to occupy (a home, a plot of land, a city, a society…) and the relationship between occupying and building and the concept of the work of art in today’s global culture.”

Fernando Alonso and the Hidden History of Cuban Ballet

She may be the prima ballerina assoluta, but Madame Alicia isn’t the only Alonso to have shaped Cuban ballet. Toba Singer’s biography of master teacher, dancer, and administrator Fernando Alonso reveals why he’s regarded as the “father of Cuban ballet.”

Carlos Acosta's Journey

The internationally acclaimed dancer proposes a new direction for Cuban ballet.
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